Skip 
Navigation Link
Medical Disorders
Resources
Basic InformationLookupsLatest News
Zika Hijacks Pregnant Woman's Immune SystemHernia Patients May Need Fewer Opioids After Surgery, Study FindsHealth Tip: Prevent DehydrationTravel Tips for Contact Lens WearersHigher Odds of Infection With Reduced Kidney FunctionMost Ulcerative Colitis Patients Do Not Achieve Target RemissionOral Contraceptive Use Linked to Lower Rheumatoid Arthritis RiskKidney Disease May Boost Odds of InfectionZika May Not Last in Semen as Long as ThoughtVirtual House Calls for Speedy, Effective Parkinson's CareNearly 4 Million Worldwide Die Each Year From Asthma, COPDPowerful New Cholesterol Med Won't Harm Memory, Easing ConcernsDiverse Spectrum of Neurologic Syndromes Seen With ZikaExposure to Particulate Matter Linked to Metabolic AlterationsAir Purifiers May Help the Smog-Stressed Heart'Fat But Fit' a Myth?Statin Use Among Nursing Home Residents Varies SignificantlyZika Virus Tied to Neurological Woes in AdultsAn Expert's Guide to Preventing Food PoisoningHeart Risk Up if Hospitalized for Pneumonia or SepsisSinging May Be Good Medicine for Parkinson's PatientsCPAP Doesn't Alter Renal Function in Coexisting OSA, CVDWhen Stress Hormone Falters, Your Health May SufferKidney Disease May Boost Risk of Abnormal HeartbeatCertain Jobs Linked to Raised Risk of Rheumatoid ArthritisMidlife Vascular Risk Factors Tied to Increased Risk of DementiaHigher Risk of CVD Persists After Hospital Stay for Severe InfectionAntibiotic Doesn't Prevent Lung Complication After Stem Cell TransplantHealth Tip: One of Three Adults Gets ShinglesBlood Pressure Fluctuations Tied to Dementia Risk in StudyDecline in Kids' Ear Infections Linked to Pneumococcal VaccineFDA Approves Mavyret for Hepatitis CDoes Less Sleep Make You Less Healthy?Diabetes Drug Shows Promise Against Parkinson'sReview Suggests Benefits of Aerobic Exercise in FibromyalgiaNovel Procedure Improves Kidney Transplant SuccessABP 501, Adalimumab Biosimilar, Safe and Effective, for PsoriasisSimilar Defects ID'd for T2DM, Chronic Pancreatitis and DiabetesScientists Gain Insight Into AllergiesHealth Tip: Cooling a Heat RashKnow the Signs of ConcussionDo Your Pearly Whites Sometimes Cause You Pain?Rates of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Down in Rural AreasZika Probably Not Spread Through Saliva: StudyDrug for Kidney Disease Tied to Infection RiskGum Disease May Be Linked to Cancer Risk in Older WomenStent Surgery Could Benefit Select Glaucoma PatientsBlood Proteins Linked to Severity of Chronic Fatigue SyndromeDrowning Can Occur Hours After SwimmingClimate Change May Trigger 60,000 More Premature Deaths by 2030
Questions and AnswersLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

20 Percent of Hospital Patients Have Side Effects From Abx Rx


HealthDay News
Updated: Jun 16th 2017

new article illustration

FRIDAY, June 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- About 20 percent of U.S. hospital patients who receive antibiotics experience side effects from the drugs, according to research published online June 12 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

The new study included 1,488 hospitalized adults who were prescribed antibiotics. The findings revealed that one-fifth of those who experienced antibiotic-related side effects didn't require the medications in the first place.

Patients in the study were hospitalized for reasons ranging from trauma to chronic disease. All received at least 24 hours of antibiotic treatment. Overall, 20 percent had one or more antibiotic-related side effects within a month of leaving the hospital. The most common were gastrointestinal (42 percent), renal (24 percent), and hematologic (15 percent) abnormalities. For every additional 10 days of antibiotic treatment, the risk of side effects rose by 3 percent, the investigators found. Over 90 days, 4 percent of study patients developed Clostridium difficile. In addition, 6 percent developed infections that were potentially drug resistant.

"Too often, clinicians prescribe antibiotics even if they have a low suspicion for a bacterial infection, thinking that even if antibiotics may not be necessary, they are probably not harmful. But that is not always the case," Pranita Tamma, M.D., director of the Pediatric Antimicrobial Stewardship Program at the Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, said in a Hopkins news release. "If the patient develops an antibiotic-associated adverse reaction, even though that is, of course, unfortunate, we should be able to take some comfort in knowing that at least the antibiotic was truly necessary."

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)