Skip 
Navigation Link
Childhood Mental Disorders and Illnesses
Resources
Basic Information
Introduction to Disorders of ChildhoodIntellectual DisabilitiesMotor Skills DisordersLearning DisordersCommunication DisordersAutism and Pervasive Developmental DisordersADHD and Disruptive Behavior DisordersFeeding and Elimination DisordersAnxiety DisordersReactive Attachment DisorderStereotypic Movement DisorderTic DisordersInfancy, Childhood or Adolescence, Not Otherwise Specified
Latest News
Communication Problems Not at Root of Tantrums in Kids With AutismNo Proof Special Diets, Supplements Work for AutismCould a Century-Old Drug Help Ease Autism Symptoms?Special Diets, Supplements for Autism Still a Question MarkProgram Helps Young Adults With Autism Find JobsTracking Devices May Ease Minds of Parents of Kids With AutismYoung Adults With Autism Need Help Managing Money: StudyAutism Greatly Boosts Kids' Injury Risk, Especially for DrowningCould a Blood Test Spot Autism in Childhood?Delayed Development ID'd in Five Brain Regions of ADHD PatientsExperimental Test Can Spot Autism in InfancyBrain Differences Hint at Why Autism Is More Common in MalesFor Kids, Regular Exercise Seems to Put Depression on the RunMicrobiota Transfer Therapy Could Help Children With AutismKids With ADHD Make 6.1 Million Doctor Visits a Year in U.S.: CDCPhysical Activity Predicts Depression in Middle ChildhoodU.S. Families Spend 1.5 Billion Hours Yearly on Kids With Special Health NeedsDown Syndrome May Not Be Big Financial Burden on FamiliesClinical Antecedents of Adolescent-Onset MDD IdentifiedFew Preschoolers Receiving Tx for Mood, Behavioral DisordersParents Often Miss Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in KidsHomeless, Mentally Ill Youth Benefit From Housing ProgramKids With Bipolar Disorder More Likely to Abuse Drugs, Alcohol: StudyModified Checklist With Follow-Up Valid for Autism in ToddlersMental Illness May Make Teens Vulnerable to Drugs, AlcoholTiming of Autism Diagnosis Tied to Choice of TreatmentHearing Impairment May Be an Early Indicator of AutismEpilepsy, Febrile Seizures in Childhood May Raise ADHD RiskInsurance Mandates Boost U.S. Autism DiagnosesDepression Strikes Nearly 3 Million U.S. Teens a YearGuideline Changes Have Asperger's Community on EdgeHarmless Brain Abnormalities in Kids Pose Disclosure Dilemmas
Questions and AnswersLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Autism
Child & Adolescent Development: Overview
Parenting
Child Development & Parenting: Infants (0-2)
Child Development & Parenting: Early (3-7)

Few Preschoolers Receiving Tx for Mood, Behavioral Disorders


HealthDay News
Updated: Nov 22nd 2016

new article illustration

TUESDAY, Nov. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Most preschoolers with mood, behavior, and social disorders would benefit from non-drug therapies, but few receive this type of help, according to a new policy statement from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) published online Nov. 21 in Pediatrics.

As many as one in 10 children younger than 5 years old experience these kinds of mental health problems, according to the report. Current evidence supports the use of family-focused therapies -- often including parent training -- as a first-line treatment for these children, the AAP reported. Yet mental health stigma, shortages of trained providers, and insurance barriers limit access to evidence-based treatment, it said.

The new report focuses on proven treatments for young children who have these mental health disorders. It notes that the effects of non-drug treatments can last for years, unlike the effects of medication. The report outlines specific family-focused therapies with strong evidence of their effectiveness. The AAP calls for greater funding of programs to expand the mental health workforce and training opportunities for pediatricians. The recommendations also focus on insurance rules and reimbursement practices that impede treatment.

"Young children's mental health needs have long been overlooked," report author Mary Margaret Gleason, M.D., an associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Tulane University School of Medicine in New Orleans, told HealthDay. "We don't want to leave children without treatment because these are real disorders that deserve treatment, and their suffering is real."

Policy Statement
Technical Report